Audio Interface Library

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Audio Interface Library
Released 1991-??-??
Programmers John Miles
Language C, x86 Assembly
Formats XMI, VOC

The Audio Interface Library (AIL) is a suite of programs and sound drivers developed by John Miles to make it easy for developers to play music and sound effects in their DOS and 16-bit Windows programs. Music is stored in XMI, a MIDI-like format which John Miles designed for the driver, and sound is stored in VOC. The driver could operate in both Real and Protected memory modes in DOS. The software was first released in 1991, and received continual upgrades by Miles for several years and becoming the most popular audio software used by DOS games. Miles then sold the library to RAD Game Tools in 1996, and the company renamed the library to the Miles Sound System to reflect the common named used among developers. Even after the sale, Miles continued to work on the library as a contract employee up to version 8 in 2011.

The software library itself contains special drivers to take play music and sound effects on a great number of audio devices while also taking advantage of their perks and providing workarounds for their limitations. Also, since XMI files are unique to the driver, several programs were included with the driver that would let developers convert existing MIDI files to XMI, log MIDI instructions into XMI format, and even a plugin for Cakewalk to create XMI files.

Release History

The first driver was released in 1991. This version used MIDI for music. Audio Interface Library version 2 was released in 1992 which dropped MIDI support for the newly created XMI music format and added support for Microsoft Windows. Starting with AIL 2.07, Miles incorporated DIGPAK, a sound library created by The Audio Solution.

The last revision of version 2, AIL version 2.14, has been released as open source by John Miles.

Version 3 (1994-09-09) added General MIDI support.

Version 3.0a (1994-10-24) added support for the Sound Blaster AWE 32, SoundScape, and increased support for UltraSound. Several revisions were made until the last version of AIL was released in February 1994.

Version 3.01 (11-22-1994) added support for the RAP-10 and the WaveJammer.

Version 3.02 (01-18-1995) included the Set Sound program which could automatically setup and test audio devices for developers. It also added full 16-bit Windows support including 3.x, 95, and NT.

Version 3.03 (06-18-1995) added support for the Windows Sound System and several Ensoniq chipsets.

Version 3.03a (06-25-1995) through 3.03d (11-22-1995) added support for WaveForce and fixed a lot of bugs. According to John Miles, this was the last version he released before selling the library to RAD who changed the name to the Miles Sound System.

Output

With the last released of the Audio Interface Library, music could be played to the following devices: AdLib, AdLib Gold 1000, General MIDI, LAPC-I, MT-32, PC Speaker, Pro AudioSpectrum, Pro AudioSpectrum Plus, Pro AudioSpectrum 16, RAP-10, Sound Blaster, Sound Blaster 2, Sound Blaster Pro, Sound Blaster Pro 2, Sound Blaster 16, Sound Blaster AWE 32, SoundScape, Tandy 3 Voice, UltraSound, and WaveJammer.

The last version of the Audio Interface Library supported playing VOC sound files to the following devices: AdLib, AdLib Gold 1000, Echo II, General MIDI, LAPC-I, MT-32, PC Speaker, Pro AudioSpectrum, Pro AudioSpectrum Plus, Pro AudioSpectrum 16, RAP-10, Sound Blaster, Sound Blaster 2, Sound Blaster Pro, Sound Blaster Pro 2, Sound Blaster 16, Sound Blaster AWE 32, Sound Master, The Sound Source, SoundScape, Speech Adapter, Speech Thing, Tandy DAC, UltraSound, Voice Adapter, Voice Master, and WaveJammer. Since several of the devices didn't have a DAC, DIGPAK would down-sample the sound files to whatever resolution the device could support.

Games

Hundreds of games used the Audio Interface Library before it switched over to the Miles Sound System, and thousands more used the MSS.

Downloads

Version Download Platform Notes
2.14 Download - (info) DOS Includes source.

Technical

Links