WaxWorks (DOS)

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WaxWorks
BoxMissing.png
Platform: DOS
Year: 1992
Developer: Horror Soft

WaxWorks is a dungeon-crawler action-RPG video game developed by Adventure Soft, under the pseudonym Horror Soft, and published by Accolade. The game came out for MS-DOS and Amiga.

The player and his twin brother Alex are playing in the vast majority of mine tunnels underneath the town of Vista Forge, but he suddenly goes missing. Several years later, your Uncle Boris who owned a wax museum has passed away, and has left his wax museum to you. You get a crystal ball from his servant which allows you to communicate with your deceased uncle. Your uncle informs you that your twin brother is still alive, but due to a curse placed on your family centuries ago by a gypsy witch, he is plotting to resurrect four of your deadliest ancestors to rule the world. Uncle Boris's wax museum uses magic that transports the player back to the four ancestor's respective time periods, so that the player may kill them.

The game uses the standard RPG elements such as health, strength, and experience levels. The 4 waxworks can be played in any order, as completing any of them resets the players' stats, as well as taking away any items that you had in the waxwork.

The game takes you through four places, in which you must stop your evil twins. In Ancient Egypt, you must stop the High Priest of Anubis. In the graveyard, you must stop Vladimir the Necromancer. In Victorian-era London, you must stop Jack the Ripper. In the mine, you must stop an evil plant monster that your brother turned into. After you defeat the evil ancestors, you must stop the witch from placing the curse. To do so, you use four items; each one from a waxwork that you completed.

Each level has its own creepy atmosphere. In London, you have no means of attack from the cops and the angry mob who roam the streets looking for you. In the graveyard, many undead creatures wish to feed on your flesh. In Ancient Egypt, you must fend off against not only the several guards and priests, but also the clever puzzles and traps found in the pyramid. In the mine level, you must save the prisoners, as well as fight off the grotesque mutant slaves who were once innocent humans. In the graveyard level, it is mostly combat-oriented, in which you slash through hordes of zombies, with your fists and a sickle being your only means of attack.

The game has been noted for its large amount of blood in gore, mainly in the death scenes. When your character dies in each waxwork, you are given a very detailed image of what has happened to them. This has made some players reluctant to play the game.

The game also came with a novella written by Richard "Dick" Moran. As a possible result of being the only non-based horror game in the series, WaxWorks was later included in the Elvira's Horror Pack trilogy. As a result, some have called WaxWorks a spiritual sequel to the two Elvira games; Elvira: Mistress of the Dark, and Elvira II: The Jaws of Cerberus.

Screenshots

WaxWorks - DOS - Title Screen.png

The title screen.

WaxWorks - DOS - Gameplay 1.png

Viewing one of the Waxworks.

WaxWorks - DOS - Gameplay 2.png

Fighting an Egyptian guard.

WaxWorks - DOS - Gameplay 3.png

Watch out for the angry mob in the London level!

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Facing off against Jack the Ripper.

WaxWorks - DOS - Gameplay 5.png

The least gory death in the game.

Music

Some of the Woodroffe family worked at Horror Soft, so they got Jezz Woodroffe to compose the music to the game. Each song represents its level very well. Spooky music in the graveyard, suspenseful music in the mines, and even ragtime piano tunes composed for the London bars. Also, each waxwork has its own unique set of songs. These songs are for the level itself, music that plays when you encounter danger, combat music, victory music, and death music. Additional songs were composed for the graveyard and London levels.

Recording

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This recording is incomplete.

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Credits

(Source)

The credits show both after waiting at the title screen and the ending sequence. The game appears to be John Canfield's only credit.

Game Rip

Format

Conversion

Download

MUS (Accolade).png

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Download

(Info)


The music was ripped during gameplay. However, fileswapping methods were executed to get the music to play at the title screen. To do this, simply rename any of the .mus files to 'mod7.mus' (mod7 is the title music). The music was logged in .DRO format in DOSBox 0.74 and then converted to VGM using DRO2VGM.

Audio Devices

Music

Icon - AdLib.png Icon - MT-32.png

Sound

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(No Source)

The game uses AdLib/SoundBlaster to play music and sound effects. For better-fidelity music, you can also use an MT-32.

There is an audio option for Tandy DAC, SoundBlaster, Roland MT-32/LAPC-I, and Thunder Board. It is unknown whether these play music, sound effects, or both.

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Audio devices need to be detailed.

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Releases

  USA.svg   USA
BoxMissing.png
Title: WaxWorks
Platform: DOS
Released: 1992-08-10
Publisher: Accolade, Inc.
  UK.svg   UK
BoxMissing.png
Title: WaxWorks
Platform: DOS
Released: 1992-??-??
Publisher: Accolade, Inc.
  Germany.svg   Germany
BoxMissing.png
Title: WaxWorks
Platform: DOS
Released: 1992-??-??
Publisher: Accolade, Inc.
  Spain.svg   Spain
BoxMissing.png
Title: WaxWorks
Platform: DOS
Released: 1993-??-??
Publisher: Accolade, Inc.

Links