Difference between revisions of "Jason Brooke"

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'''''Jason Brooke''''' (best known as Jas.C.Brooke) is a British composer who worked on the music and sound to many arcade computer game adaptions. He spent most of his early career at [[Mastertronic]] composing music for their ports to early home computer systems like the [[Atari 8-bit]] models, the [[Amstrad CPC]], and the [[Commodore 64]]. He is noted as one of the more popular European 8 bit composers. He did a small amount of programming as well, but around 1990 he began to focus less on music and more on programming, especially on Nintendo's [[Game Boy]] systems.
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'''''Jason Brooke''''' (he goes by Jas.C.Brooke) is a former British video game programmer and composer. He worked on the music and sound to many arcade computer game adaptions. He spent most of his early career porting music to early home computer systems like the [[Atari 8-bit]] models, the [[Amstrad CPC]], and the [[Commodore 64]]. He is noted as one of the more popular European 8-bit composers.
  
Jason started out in school when a friend of his owned a ZX81 computer. Jason tried it for himself and was fascinated with it. In 1983, he had saved up enough money to buy his own [[ZX Spectrum]]. Jason wanted to compose music for a living, but after being told by his school that it was too unrealistic, he teamed up with a schoolmate of his who also was a programmer, and they had developed a piece of music software, which was later bought by [[Beam Software|Melbourne House]]. However, the software was never released.
+
Brooke started out composing as a hobby on a Casio MT-31 and PT-30. He wanted to compose for a living, but was told by his school to learn to differentiate between dreams and reality. Just then, he saw his schoolmate programming on his Sinclair ZX81 computer. He tried it for himself and was fascinated with it. In 1983, he had saved up enough money to buy his own [[ZX Spectrum]]. In 1984, he teamed up with another schoolmate, Martin H. "Boffy" Smith. They programmed various things and sold a music editor called ''Muzik'' to [[Beam Software|Melbourne House]] for £300. However, it was never released.
  
Jason wrote a Christmas-themed game called Plum Duff. He was trying to sell the game, and found Bug-Byte in 1985. Seeing as Binary Design were looking for game programmers, Jason applied and got the job and by early 1986, he had moved and started his job at Binary Design.
+
From June to October 1985, Brooke wrote a Christmas game called [[Plum Duff (ZXS)]] which he later updated and sold to [[Bug-Byte]], probably in late 1987. Around Christmas 1985, he heard that [[Binary Design]] was looking for game programmers, applied, got the job, and moved to Prestwich, Greater Manchester in March 1986.
  
While working at [[Binary Design]], Jason worked with the legendary [[David Whittaker]], who had him write different sound drivers for him. Binary eventually changed to Binary Sight and Sound (Jason being the 'sound' part of the title). Around this time, David Whittaker made a sister company to Icon Design called [[Musicon Design]]. David offered Jason a job at his company and he accepted and joined Whittaker in late 1987.
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Binary's musician was the legendary [[David Whittaker]], who had Brooke write different sound drivers for him. By late April 1987, Whittaker had left and Brooke had become Binary's musician. In November 1987, Brooke followed Whittaker to [[Musicon Design]].
  
One of Jason's jobs was to port arcade soundtracks to the home computers, which he was able to do through audio cassettes that were sent to the company of the original arcade soundtracks.
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Later, Brooke worked for [[Zippo Games]] and worked on soundtracks for them, and also did some freelance projects for game companies. Around 1990 he began to focus less on music and more on programming. In 1996, Brooke was about to retire from working on video games, until he learned about Perfect Entertainment's new office in his hometown which he joined. However, in 1998, due to financial troubles, Brooke was let go from the company. Brooke then went to work for [[Software Creations]], mainly working on Game Boy games. However, in 2001, Software Creations went out of business and Brooke joined Acclaim with some former Software Creations staff. There, he worked on the Gamecube and Xbox, but he found the games unethical and quit the video game industry in 2003.
  
Later, Jason worked for Zippo Games and worked on soundtracks for them, and also did some freelance projects for game companies. In 1996, Jason was about to retire from working on video games, until he learned about Perfect Entertainment's new office in his hometown which he joined. However, in 1998, due to financial troubles, Jason was let go from the company. Jason then went to work for [[Software Creations]], mainly working on Game Boy games. However, in 2001, Software Creations went out of business and Jason left and joined Acclaim with some former Software Creations staff. There, he worked on the Gamecube and Xbox, but he was unhappy with his job and quit the video game industry in 2003.
+
Brooke does not listen to much music anymore, because he still imagines arranging for 3 voices. He regularly tweets about Christianity and British politics, occasionally puns and his past. He is the brother of video game graphic designer and artist Lyndon Brooke.
  
He is the brother of video game graphic designer and artist Lyndon Brooke.
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==Music Development==
 +
===Amiga/Atari ST===
 +
Brooke programmed and arranged directly on these platforms.
 +
 
 +
===Amstrad CPC/MSX/ZX Spectrum 128===
 +
Brooke programmed, arranged and tested on a Tatung Einstein. He could test on the Einstein because all 4 platforms had the same CPU and [[AY-3-8910|sound chip]], only at different clocks and ports.
 +
 
 +
===Atari 800/Commodore 64/ZX Spectrum 48K===
 +
Brooke programmed and arranged on a Tatung Einstein and transferred the compiled code to the target platform to test the songs.
 +
 
 +
===DOS===
 +
Brooke programmed for the [[AdLib|Ad Lib Music Synthesizer Card]].
  
 
==Gameography==
 
==Gameography==
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| 1987-1?-??
 
| 1987-1?-??
 
| [[Lawn Tennis (C64)]]
 
| [[Lawn Tennis (C64)]]
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|
 +
|-
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| 1987-1?-??
 +
| [[Plum Duff (ZXS)]]
 
|  
 
|  
 
|-
 
|-
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| 1988-0?-??
 
| 1988-0?-??
 
| [[Ikari Warriors (C64)]]
 
| [[Ikari Warriors (C64)]]
|  
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| Loading Music by [[Mark Cooksey]].
 
|-
 
|-
 
| 1988-0?-??
 
| 1988-0?-??

Latest revision as of 20:57, 8 February 2020

Jason C. Brooke
Jason Brooke.jpg
Born Late 1960s
Birth Place Kippax, West Yorkshire, England
Nationality British   UK.svg
Aliases Jas.C.Brooke
Jas
Jas C Brooke
Jaz Brooke
Musicon Design
Jas.Brooke
J.Brooke
Jas C. Brooke
Jason.Brooke
Jason Brooke
Jason.C.Brook
Jas Brooke

Jason Brooke (he goes by Jas.C.Brooke) is a former British video game programmer and composer. He worked on the music and sound to many arcade computer game adaptions. He spent most of his early career porting music to early home computer systems like the Atari 8-bit models, the Amstrad CPC, and the Commodore 64. He is noted as one of the more popular European 8-bit composers.

Brooke started out composing as a hobby on a Casio MT-31 and PT-30. He wanted to compose for a living, but was told by his school to learn to differentiate between dreams and reality. Just then, he saw his schoolmate programming on his Sinclair ZX81 computer. He tried it for himself and was fascinated with it. In 1983, he had saved up enough money to buy his own ZX Spectrum. In 1984, he teamed up with another schoolmate, Martin H. "Boffy" Smith. They programmed various things and sold a music editor called Muzik to Melbourne House for £300. However, it was never released.

From June to October 1985, Brooke wrote a Christmas game called Plum Duff (ZXS) which he later updated and sold to Bug-Byte, probably in late 1987. Around Christmas 1985, he heard that Binary Design was looking for game programmers, applied, got the job, and moved to Prestwich, Greater Manchester in March 1986.

Binary's musician was the legendary David Whittaker, who had Brooke write different sound drivers for him. By late April 1987, Whittaker had left and Brooke had become Binary's musician. In November 1987, Brooke followed Whittaker to Musicon Design.

Later, Brooke worked for Zippo Games and worked on soundtracks for them, and also did some freelance projects for game companies. Around 1990 he began to focus less on music and more on programming. In 1996, Brooke was about to retire from working on video games, until he learned about Perfect Entertainment's new office in his hometown which he joined. However, in 1998, due to financial troubles, Brooke was let go from the company. Brooke then went to work for Software Creations, mainly working on Game Boy games. However, in 2001, Software Creations went out of business and Brooke joined Acclaim with some former Software Creations staff. There, he worked on the Gamecube and Xbox, but he found the games unethical and quit the video game industry in 2003.

Brooke does not listen to much music anymore, because he still imagines arranging for 3 voices. He regularly tweets about Christianity and British politics, occasionally puns and his past. He is the brother of video game graphic designer and artist Lyndon Brooke.

Music Development

Amiga/Atari ST

Brooke programmed and arranged directly on these platforms.

Amstrad CPC/MSX/ZX Spectrum 128

Brooke programmed, arranged and tested on a Tatung Einstein. He could test on the Einstein because all 4 platforms had the same CPU and sound chip, only at different clocks and ports.

Atari 800/Commodore 64/ZX Spectrum 48K

Brooke programmed and arranged on a Tatung Einstein and transferred the compiled code to the target platform to test the songs.

DOS

Brooke programmed for the Ad Lib Music Synthesizer Card.

Gameography

Note: Jason mentioned in an interview working on an NES game for Rare, developed by Zippo that was not released. This game is thought to be Roller Thrasher.

Released Title Sample
Unreleased Roller Thrasher (NES) Composer?
1986-??-?? 180 (A8)
1986-??-?? 180 (C64) Composer?
1986-??-?? 180 (CPC) Composer?
1986-??-?? 180 (ZXS) Composer?
1987-04-?? Strike! (C64)
1987-08-?? Pi r Squared (C64)
1987-0?-?? Bismarck (C64) Sound Driver by David Dunn
1987-0?-?? Rasterscan (C64)
1987-0?-?? Motos (C64)
1987-11-?? Inspector Gadget and the Circus of Fear (C64)
1987-12-?? Garfield: Big, Fat, Hairy Deal (C64) Sound Effects
1987-1?-?? Andy Capp (C64)
1987-1?-?? Bosconian '87 (C64)
1987-1?-?? Lawn Tennis (C64)
1987-1?-?? Plum Duff (ZXS)
1987-1?-?? OutRun (C64)
1987-??-?? 1943: The Battle of Midway (AMI)
1987-??-?? Boot Camp (ZXS)
1987-??-?? Bosconian '87 (CPC)
1987-??-?? Bosconian '87 (ZXS)
1987-??-?? Combat School (CPC)
1987-??-?? Feud (AMI)
1987-??-?? Motos (ZXS)
1987-??-?? Rockford: The Arcade Game (AST)
1987-??-?? World Darts (AMI)
1988-02-?? Rockford: The Arcade Game (C64)
1988-03-?? Pac-Land (C64)
1988-05-?? Super Trolley (C64) Composer?/Sound Driver
1988-05-?? Vixen (C64)
1988-0?-?? Ikari Warriors (C64) Loading Music by Mark Cooksey.
1988-0?-?? Lazer Tag (C64)
1988-0?-?? Ninja Scooter Simulator (C64) Composer?/Sound Driver
1988-12-?? Tiger Road (C64) Sound Driver by David Whittaker
1988-1?-?? Turbo Boat Simulator (C64) Sound Driver by Rob Hubbard
1988-??-?? Contra (C64)
1988-??-?? Heavy Metal (AST)
1988-??-?? Hellfire Attack (AMI)
1988-??-?? Ikari Warriors (AST)
1988-??-?? OutRun (AMI)
1988-??-?? Ramparts (ZXS)
1988-??-?? Return of the Mutant Camels (AST)
1988-??-?? Rockford: The Arcade Game (AMI)
1988-??-?? Savage (CPC)
1988-??-?? Savage (DOS)
1988-??-?? Savage (ZXS)
1988-??-?? Sky Shark (AST)
1988-??-?? Vixen (AMI)
1988-??-?? Vixen (DOS)
1988-??-?? Vixen (ZXS)
1989-0?-?? Street Cred Football (C64)
1989-0?-?? Supertrux (C64)
1989-12-?? Operation Neptune (C64) Sound Driver
1989-1?-?? Ballistix (C64)
1989-??-?? After Burner (AMI)
1989-??-?? After Burner II (AMI)
1989-??-?? Eye of Horus (DOS)
1989-??-?? Ikari Warriors (AMI)
1989-??-?? Pac-Land (AMI)
1989-??-?? Side Arms (AMI)
1989-??-?? Space Harrier (AMI)
1989-??-?? Super Trux (ZXS)
1989-??-?? Thunder Blade (AMI)
1989-??-?? Thunder Blade (C64) US Version Only. Arranger?/Sound Driver
1990-??-?? F29 Retaliator (DOS)
1990-??-?? Harley Davidson: The Road to Sturgis (AMI)
1990-??-?? Heavy Metal (AMI)
1990-??-?? Heavy Metal (ZXS)
1990-??-?? Hoverforce (DOS)
1990-??-?? Resolution 101 (AMI)
1990-??-?? Thunderstrike (AMI)
1990-??-?? Thunderstrike (DOS)
1990-??-?? Turbo Out Run (DOS)
Unreleased Dreadnought (C64)

Picture Gallery

Links